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© Christine Schmitt, Sophie Goyard, Jean-Marc Panaud
Trypanosoma vivax - forme sanguine. Responsable de la trypanosomose animale ou Nagana.
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Transmission potential of Rickettsia felis infection by Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 08 Jun 2015

Dieme C, Bechah Y, Socolovschi C, Audoly G, Berenger JM, Faye O, Raoult D, Parola P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 26056256

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2015 Jun;112(26):8088-93

A growing number of recent reports have implicated Rickettsia felis as a human pathogen, paralleling the increasing detection of R. felis in arthropod hosts across the globe, primarily in fleas. Here Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, the primary malarial vectors in sub-Saharan Africa, were fed with either blood meal infected with R. felis or infected cellular media administered in membrane feeding systems. In addition, a group of mosquitoes was fed on R. felis-infected BALB/c mice. The acquisition and persistence of R. felis in mosquitoes was demonstrated by quantitative PCR detection of the bacteria up to day 15 postinfection. R. felis was detected in mosquito feces up to day 14. Furthermore, R. felis was visualized by immunofluorescence in salivary glands, in and around the gut, and in the ovaries, although no vertical transmission was observed. R. felis was also found in the cotton used for sucrose feeding after the mosquitoes were fed infected blood. Natural bites from R. felis-infected An. gambiae were able to cause transient rickettsemias in mice, indicating that this mosquito species has the potential to be a vector of R. felis infection. This is particularly important given the recent report of high prevalence of R. felis infection in patients with “fever of unknown origin” in malaria-endemic areas.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26056256