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© Michel-Robert Popoff
Clostridium difficile en microscopie à contraste de phase. On distingue des bactéries sporulées, non sporulées et d'autres en cours de lyse (destruction). Bactérie de l'environnement (sol, eau, foin, sable), elle est à l'origine d'infections nosocomiales survenant après un traitement antibiotique : Clostridium difficile prédomine alors que les autres bactéries de la flore intestinale ont été détruites. L'infection peut provoquer deux types de pathologies graves : les colites pseudo-membraneuses dont l'origine est quasiment due à 100 % à C. difficile et la diarrhée post-antibiothérapie due à C. difficile dans 30 % des cas de ces diarrhées.
Publication : PloS one

Tissue compartment analysis for biomarker discovery by gene expression profiling

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in PloS one - 10 Nov 2009

Disset A, Cheval L, Soutourina O, Duong Van Huyen JP, Li G, Genin C, Tostain J, Loupy A, Doucet A, Rajerison R

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 19901995

PLoS ONE 2009;4(11):e7779

Although high throughput technologies for gene profiling are reliable tools, sample/tissue heterogeneity limits their outcomes when applied to identify molecular markers. Indeed, inter-sample differences in cell composition contribute to scatter the data, preventing detection of small but relevant changes in gene expression level. To date, attempts to circumvent this difficulty were based on isolation of the different cell structures constituting biological samples. As an alternate approach, we developed a tissue compartment analysis (TCA) method to assess the cell composition of tissue samples, and applied it to standardize data and to identify biomarkers.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19901995