Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Human genetics

The X-inactivation trans-activator Rnf12 is negatively regulated by pluripotency factors in embryonic stem cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Human genetics - 05 May 2011

Navarro P, Moffat M, Mullin NP, Chambers I

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21544581

Hum. Genet. 2011 Aug;130(2):255-64

X-inactivation, the molecular mechanism enabling dosage compensation in mammals, is tightly controlled during mouse early embryogenesis. In the morula, X-inactivation is imprinted with exclusive silencing of the paternally inherited X-chromosome. In contrast, in the post-implantation epiblast, X-inactivation affects randomly either the paternal or the maternal X-chromosome. The transition from imprinted to random X-inactivation takes place in the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst from which embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived. The trigger of X-inactivation, Xist, is specifically downregulated in the pluripotent cells of the ICM, thereby ensuring the reactivation of the inactive paternal X-chromosome and the transient presence of two active X-chromosomes. Moreover, Tsix, a critical cis-repressor of Xist, is upregulated in the ICM and in ES cells where it imposes a particular chromatin state at the Xist promoter that ensures the establishment of random X-inactivation upon differentiation. Recently, we have shown that key transcription factors supporting pluripotency directly repress Xist and activate Tsix and thus couple Xist/Tsix control to pluripotency. In this manuscript, we report that Rnf12, a third X-linked gene critical for the regulation of X-inactivation, is under the control of Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2, the three factors lying at the heart of the pluripotency network. We conclude that in mouse ES cells the pluripotency-associated machinery exerts an exhaustive control of X-inactivation by taking over the regulation of all three major regulators of X-inactivation: Xist, Tsix, and Rnf12.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21544581