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© Institut Pasteur
Macrophages et lymphocytes de souris. Image colorisée.
Publication : Nucleic acids research

The role of components of recombination signal sequences in immunoglobulin gene segment usage: a V81x model

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Nucleic acids research - 01 Jun 1999

Larijani M, Yu CC, Golub R, Lam QL, Wu GE

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10325418

Nucleic Acids Res. 1999 Jun;27(11):2304-9

It has long been appreciated that some immunoglobulin (and T-cell receptor) gene segments are used much more frequently than others. The VHsegment V81x is a particularly striking case of overusage. Its usage varies with the stage of B-cell development and with the strain of mice, but it is always high in B cell progenitors. We have found that the coding sequence and the recombination signal sequences (RSS) are identical in five mouse strains, including CAST/Ei, a strain derived from the species Mus castaneus. Thus, the strain differences cannot be attributed to sequences within V81x itself. V81x RSS mediated recombination at rates significantly higher than another VHRSS. Although the V81x nonamer differs at one base pair from the consensus sequence, an RSS with this nonamer and a consensus heptamer recombines as well as the consensus RSS. When the V81x spacer is replaced by that of VA1, the frequency of recombination decreases by approximately 5-fold; thus, the contribution of variation in natural spacers to variability in VHusage in vivo is likely to be more than has been previously appreciated. Furthermore, the contribution of the heptamer and nonamer to differential VHusage in our assay is correlated inversely with their conservation throughout the VHlocus.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10325418