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© Research
Publication : Molecular biology of the cell

SWI/SNF deficiency results in aberrant chromatin organization, mitotic failure, and diminished proliferative capacity

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular biology of the cell - 20 May 2009

Bourgo RJ, Siddiqui H, Fox S, Solomon D, Sansam CG, Yaniv M, Muchardt C, Metzger D, Chambon P, Roberts CW, Knudsen ES

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 19458193

Mol. Biol. Cell 2009 Jul;20(14):3192-9

Switch (SWI)/sucrose nonfermentable (SNF) is an evolutionarily conserved complex with ATPase function, capable of regulating nucleosome position to alter transcriptional programs within the cell. It is known that the SWI/SNF complex is responsible for regulation of many genes involved in cell cycle control and proliferation, and it has recently been implicated in cancer development. The ATPase action of SWI/SNF is conferred through either the brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1) or brahma (Brm) subunit of the complex, and it is of central importance to the modification of nucleosome position. In this study, the role of the Brg1 and Brm subunits were examined as they relate to chromatin structure and organization. Deletion of the Brg1 ATPase results in dissolution of pericentromeric heterochromatin domains and a redistribution of histone modifications associated with these structures. This effect was highly specific to Brg1 and is not reproduced by the loss of Brm or SNF5/BAF47/INI1. Brg1 deficiency is associated with the appearance of micronuclei and aberrant mitoses that are a by-product of dissociated chromatin structure. Thus, Brg1 plays a critical role in maintaining chromatin structural integrity.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19458193