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© Perrine Bomme, Guillaume Duménil, Jean-Marc Panaud.
Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Neisseria meningitidis on epithelial cells
Publication : The Journal of infectious diseases

Strains Responsible for Invasive Meningococcal Disease in Patients With Terminal Complement Pathway Deficiencies

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of infectious diseases - 15 Apr 2017

Rosain J, Hong E, Fieschi C, Martins PV, El Sissy C, Deghmane AE, Ouachée M, Thomas C, Launay D, de Pontual L, Suarez F, Moshous D, Picard C, Taha MK, Frémeaux-Bacchi V

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28368462

J. Infect. Dis. 2017 04;215(8):1331-1338

Background: Patients with terminal complement pathway deficiency (TPD) are susceptible to recurrent invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) strains infecting these patients are poorly documented in the literature.

Methods: We identified patients with TPD and available Nm strains isolated during IMD. We investigated the genetic basis of the different TPDs and the characteristics of the Nm strains.

Results: We included 56 patients with C5 (n = 8), C6 (n = 20), C7 (n = 18), C8 (n = 9), or C9 (n = 1) deficiency. Genetic study was performed in 47 patients and 30 pathogenic variants were identified in the genes coding for C5 (n = 4), C6 (n = 5), C7 (n = 12), C8 (n = 7), and C9 (n = 2). We characterized 61 Nm strains responsible for IMD in the 56 patients with TPD. The most frequent strains belonged to groups Y (n = 27 [44%]), B (n = 18 [30%]), and W (n = 8 [13%]). Hyperinvasive clonal complexes (CC11, CC32, CC41/44, and CC269) were responsible for 21% of IMD cases. The CC23 predominates and represented 26% of all invasive isolates. Eleven of the 15 clonal complexes identified fit to 12 different clonal complexes belonging to carriage strains.

Conclusions: Unusual meningococcal strains with low level of virulence similar to carriage strains are most frequently responsible for IMD in patients with TPD.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28368462