Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Microbial drug resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.)

Staphylococcus aureus Infecting and Colonizing Experimental Animals, Macaques, in a Research Animal Facility.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Microbial drug resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.) - 01 Jan 2019

Pardos de la Gandara M, Diaz L, Euler CW, Chung M, Gonzalez A, Cheleuitte C, Freiwald W, Tomasz A, Fischetti VA, de Lencastre H,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 30481118

Link to DOI [DOI] – 10.1089/mdr.2018.0232

Microb. Drug Resist. ; 25(1): 54-62

An outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections on the skin and soft tissues of experimental macaques in the vivarium of The Rockefeller University, New York, triggered this observational and interventional study. We screened 14 macaques in the colony (samples from head, nares, and rectum) and their housing (40 environmental surfaces) four times in 1 year, for S. aureus colonization or contamination, while implementing enhanced decolonization and decontamination procedures. A total of 114 isolates of S. aureus were recovered and characterized (antibiograms, spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE], mecA, Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, and arginine catabolic mobile element). Based on these results, six strains of S. aureus were identified: two MRSA strains (t16708/ST3862/PFGE-A, t16709/ST3862/PFGE-C) and one methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (t8397/ST3884/PFGE-D) were characterized for the first time in this study; strains belonging to spa types t189 and t4167 have been identified in primates in previous studies. None of these strains was common to the neighboring New York City human community. Thus, it seems probable that the animals were already colonized upon arrival to the University. We suggest screening primates for S. aureus carriage upon arrival to University vivaria and possible implementation of extensive decolonization procedures before any surgical interventions.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30481118