Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : Neurocritical care

Significance of Parenchymal Brain Damage in Patients with Critical Illness

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Neurocritical care - 01 Oct 2015

Sutter R, Chalela JA, Leigh R, Kaplan PW, Yenokyan G, Sharshar T, Stevens RD

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 25650012

Neurocrit Care 2015 Oct;23(2):243-52

BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence, type, and significance of brain damage in critically ill patients with a primary non-neurological diagnosis developing acute brain dysfunction.

METHODS: This retrospective cohort study was performed at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, an academic tertiary care hospital. Medical records were reviewed of 479 consecutive ICU patients who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over a 2-year period. Patients were selected for analysis if MRI was obtained to evaluate an acute onset of brain dysfunction (altered mental status, seizures, and/or focal neurological deficit). Subjects with a history of a central nervous system disorder were excluded. The principal clinical endpoint was Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) assessed at discharge. MRI-defined brain abnormalities were classified according to type and location. Factors associated with MRI-defined abnormalities were assessed in uni- and multivariable models.

RESULTS: 146 patients met inclusion criteria (mean age 54 ± 7 years). Brain damage was detected in 130 patients (89 %). The most prevalent lesions were white matter hyperintensities (104/146, 71 %) and acute cerebral infarcts (59/146, 40 %). In a multivariable model, lesions on brain MRI were independently associated with unfavorable outcome (GOS1-3 in 71 % of patients with lesions vs. 44 % in those without, p = 0.007). No adverse events occurred in relation to transport and MRI scanning.

CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients without known neurological disease who have acute brain dysfunction, MRI reveals an unexpectedly high burden of underlying brain damage, which is associated with unfavorable outcome. The results indicate that brain damage could be an important and under-recognized factor contributing to critical illness brain dysfunction.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25650012