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© Research
Publication : Molecular Microbiology

Signals and signal transduction pathways in Entamoeba histolytica during the life cycle and when interacting with bacteria or human cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular Microbiology - 23 Nov 2020

Nancy Guillen

Link to DOI – 10.1111/mmi.14657

Molecular Microbiology. 2020;00:1–15

Entamoeba histolytica is the etiological agent of amebiasis in humans. This ameba
parasite resides as a commensal in the intestine where it shares intestinal resources
with the bacterial microbiome. In the intestinal ecosystem, the ameba encysts and
eventually develops disease by invading the tissues. E. histolytica possesses cell surface
receptors for the proper sensing of signals involved in encystation or sustaining
parasite interaction with bacteria and human cells. Among those receptors are
the Gal/GalNAc lectin, G protein-coupled receptors, and transmembrane kinases.
In addition there are recently discovered, promising proteins, including orthologs of
Toll-type receptors and β trefoil lectins. These proteins trigger a wide variety of signal
transduction pathways; however, most of the players involved in the signaling
pathways evoked in this parasite are unknown. This review provides an overview of
amoebic receptors and their role in encystation, adherence to bacteria or human
cells, as well as the reported intracellular signal transduction processes that they can
trigger. This knowledge is essential for understanding the lifestyle of E. histolytica and
its cytopathic effect on bacteria and human cells that are responsible for infection.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/mmi.14657