Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Epidemiology and infection

Seasonality of urinary tract infections in the United Kingdom in different age groups: longitudinal analysis of The Health Improvement Network (THIN)

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Epidemiology and infection - 23 Nov 2017

Rosello A, Pouwels KB, Domenech DE Cellès M, VAN Kleef E, Hayward AC, Hopkins S, Robotham JV, Smieszek T, Opatowski L, Deeny SR

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 29168442

Epidemiol. Infect. 2018 01;146(1):37-45

Evidence regarding the seasonality of urinary tract infection (UTI) consultations in primary care is conflicting and methodologically poor. To our knowledge, this is the first study to determine whether this seasonality exists in the UK, identify the peak months and describe seasonality by age. The monthly number of UTI consultations (N = 992 803) and nitrofurantoin and trimethoprim prescriptions (N = 1 719 416) during 2008-2015 was extracted from The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a large nationally representative UK dataset of electronic patient records. Negative binomial regression models were fitted to these data to investigate seasonal fluctuations by age group (14-17, 18-24, 25-45, 46-69, 70-84, 85+) and by sex, accounting for a change in the rate of UTI over the study period. A September to November peak in UTI consultation incidence was observed for ages 14-69. This seasonality progressively faded in older age groups and no seasonality was found in individuals aged 85+, in whom UTIs were most common. UTIs were rare in males but followed a similar seasonal pattern than in females. We show strong evidence of an autumnal seasonality for UTIs in individuals under 70 years of age and a lack of seasonality in the very old. These findings should provide helpful information when interpreting surveillance reports and the results of interventions against UTI.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29168442