Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : The Journal of biological chemistry

Role of sterols in modulating the human mu-opioid receptor function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of biological chemistry - 27 Oct 2000

Lagane B, Gaibelet G, Meilhoc E, Masson JM, Cézanne L, Lopez A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10973945

J. Biol. Chem. 2000 Oct;275(43):33197-200

This study provides evidence that the differences in membrane composition found from one cell type to another can represent a limiting factor to recovering the functionality of transmembrane proteins when expressed in heterologous systems. Restoring the properties of the human mu-opioid receptor in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), similar to those observed in native cells, was achieved by replacing ergosterol from yeast by cholesterol, which is normally found in mammalian plasma membranes. The results suggest that these two sterols have opposite effects with respect to the ligand binding function of the receptor. Ergosterol was found to constrain the mu-opioid receptor in an inactive state in yeast plasma membranes and cannot replace cholesterol in activating it. These data differ from previous works dealing with the function of related G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) in ergosterol-enriched membranes. This suggests that structural requirements of GPCR with respect to their modulation by lipid components differ from one protein to another. As a consequence, we assume that the presence of appropriate lipids around transmembrane proteins determines their function. This highlights the functional significance of lateral heterogeneities of membrane components within biological membranes.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10973945