Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Clinician Researcher
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Prize
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Clinician Researcher
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Prize
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Institut Pasteur
Macrophages et lymphocytes de souris. Image colorisée.
Publication : Immunity

Role of MR1-driven signals and amphiregulin on the recruitment and repair function of MAIT cells during skin wound healing.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Immunity - 10 Jan 2023

du Halgouet A, Darbois A, Alkobtawi M, Mestdagh M, Alphonse A, Premel V, Yvorra T, Colombeau L, Rodriguez R, Zaiss D, El Morr Y, Bugaut H, Legoux F, Perrin L, Aractingi S, Golub R, Lantz O, Salou M,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 36630919

Link to DOI – 10.1016/j.immuni.2022.12.004S1074-7613(22)00640-9

Immunity 2023 Jan; 56(1): 78-92.e6

Tissue repair processes maintain proper organ function following mechanical or infection-related damage. In addition to antibacterial properties, mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a tissue repair transcriptomic program and promote skin wound healing when expanded. Herein, we use a human-like mouse model of full-thickness skin excision to assess the underlying mechanisms of MAIT cell tissue repair function. Single-cell RNA sequencing analysis suggested that skin MAIT cells already express a repair program at steady state. Following skin excision, MAIT cells promoted keratinocyte proliferation, thereby accelerating healing. Using skin grafts, parabiosis, and adoptive transfer experiments, we show that MAIT cells migrated into the wound in a T cell receptor (TCR)-independent but CXCR6 chemokine receptor-dependent manner. Amphiregulin secreted by MAIT cells following excision promoted wound healing. Expression of the repair function was probably independent of sustained TCR stimulation. Overall, our study provides mechanistic insights into MAIT cell wound healing function in the skin.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36630919