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© Research
Publication : Neuroscience letters

Regulation of mu opioid receptor internalization by the scaffold protein RanBPM

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Neuroscience letters - 27 Sep 2009

Talbot JN, Skifter DA, Bianchi E, Monaghan DT, Toews ML, Murrin LC

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 19788913

Neurosci. Lett. 2009 Dec;466(3):154-8

Mu opioid receptors (MOP) are transducers of the pharmacological effects of many opioid drugs, including analgesia and tolerance/dependence. Previously, we observed increased MOP signaling during postnatal development that was not associated with increased MOP or G protein expression. A yeast two-hybrid screen of a human brain cDNA library using the MOP C-terminus as bait identified RanBPM as a potential MOP-interacting protein. RanBPM has been recognized as a multi-functional scaffold protein that interacts with a variety of signaling receptors/proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation studies in HEK293 cells indicated that RanBPM constitutively associates with MOP. Functionally, RanBPM had no effect on MOP-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase, yet reduced agonist-induced endocytosis of MOP. Mechanistically, RanBPM interfered with beta arrestin2-GFP translocation stimulated by MOP but not alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor activation, indicating selectivity of action. Our findings suggest that RanBPM is a novel MOP-interacting protein that negatively regulates receptor internalization without altering MOP signaling through adenylyl cyclase.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19788913