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© Research
Publication : Eukaryotic cell

Population polymorphism of nuclear mitochondrial DNA insertions reveals widespread diploidy associated with loss of heterozygosity in Debaryomyces hansenii

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Eukaryotic cell - 04 Jan 2010

Jacques N, Sacerdot C, Derkaoui M, Dujon B, Ozier-Kalogeropoulos O, Casaregola S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 20048048

Eukaryotic Cell 2010 Mar;9(3):449-59

Debaryomyces hansenii, a yeast that participates in the elaboration of foodstuff, displays important genetic diversity. Our recent phylogenetic classification of this species led to the subdivision of the species into three distinct clades. D. hansenii harbors the highest number of nuclear mitochondrial DNA (NUMT) insertions known so far for hemiascomycetous yeasts. Here we assessed the intraspecific variability of the NUMTs in this species by testing their presence/absence first in 28 strains, with 21 loci previously detected in the completely sequenced strain CBS 767(T), and second in a larger panel of 77 strains, with 8 most informative loci. We were able for the first time to structure populations in D. hansenii, although we observed little NUMT insertion variability within the clades. We determined the chronology of the NUMT insertions, which turned out to correlate with the previously defined taxonomy and provided additional evidence that colonization of nuclear genomes by mitochondrial DNA is a dynamic process in yeast. In combination with flow cytometry experiments, the NUMT analysis revealed the existence of both haploid and diploid strains, the latter being heterozygous and resulting from at least four crosses among strains from the various clades. As in the diploid pathogen Candida albicans, to which D. hansenii is phylogenetically related, we observed a differential loss of heterozygosity in the diploid strains, which can explain some of the large genetic diversity found in D. hansenii over the years.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20048048