Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases

Population genetics-informed meta-analysis in seven genes associated with risk to dengue fever disease.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases - 01 Aug 2018

Oliveira M, Saraiva DP, Cavadas B, Fernandes V, Pedro N, Casademont I, Koeth F, Alshamali F, Harich N, Cherni L, Sierra B, Guzman MG, Sakuntabhai A, Pereira L,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 29673983

Link to DOI [DOI] – S1567-1348(18)30196-510.1016/j.meegid.2018.04.018

Infect. Genet. Evol. 2018 08; 62(): 60-72

Population genetics theory predicted that rare frequent markers would be the main contributors for heritability of complex diseases, but meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies are revealing otherwise common markers, present in all population groups, as the identified candidate genes. In this work, we applied a population-genetics informed meta-analysis to 10 markers located in seven genes said to be associated with dengue fever disease. Seven markers (in PLCE1, CD32, CD209, OAS1 and OAS3 genes) have high-frequency and the other three (in MICB and TNFA genes) have intermediate frequency. Most of these markers have high discriminatory power between population groups, but their frequencies follow the rules of genetic drift, and seem to have not been under strong selective pressure. There was a good agreement in directional consistency across trans-ethnic association signals, in East Asian and Latin American cohorts, with heterogeneity generated by randomness between studies and especially by low sample sizes. This led to confirm the following significant associations: with DF, odds ratio of 0.67 for TNFA-rs1800629-A; with DHF, 0.82 for CD32-rs1801274-G; with DSS, 0.55 for OAS3-rs2285933-G, 0.80 for PLCE1-rs2274223-G and 1.32 for MICB-rs3132468-C. The overall genetic risks confirmed sub-Saharan African populations and descendants as the best protected against the severer forms of the disease, while Southeast and Northeast Asians are the least protected ones. European and close neighbours are the best protected against dengue fever, while, again, Southeast and Northeast Asians are the least protected ones. These risk scores provide important predictive information for the largely naïve European and North American regions, as well as for Africa where misdiagnosis with other hemorrhagic diseases is of concern.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29673983