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© Christine Schmitt, Meriem El Ghachi, Jean-Marc Panaud
Bactérie Helicobacter pylori en microscopie électronique à balayage. Agent causal de pathologies de l'estomac : elle est responsable des gastrites chroniques, d'ulcères gastriques et duodénaux et elle joue un rôle important dans la genèse des cancers gastriques (adénocarcinomes et lymphomes).
Publication : Cell host & microbe

Peptidoglycan sensing by the receptor PGRP-LE in the Drosophila gut induces immune responses to infectious bacteria and tolerance to microbiota

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Cell host & microbe - 16 Aug 2012

Bosco-Drayon V, Poidevin M, Boneca IG, Narbonne-Reveau K, Royet J, Charroux B

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22901536

Cell Host Microbe 2012 Aug;12(2):153-65

Gut epithelial cells contact both commensal and pathogenic bacteria, and proper responses to these bacteria require a balance of positive and negative regulatory signals. In the Drosophila intestine, peptidoglycan-recognition proteins (PGRPs), including PGRP-LE, play central roles in bacterial recognition and activation of immune responses, including induction of the IMD-NF-κB pathway. We show that bacteria recognition is regionalized in the Drosophila gut with various functional regions requiring different PGRPs. Specifically, peptidoglycan recognition by PGRP-LE in the gut induces NF-κB-dependent responses to infectious bacteria but also immune tolerance to microbiota through upregulation of pirk and PGRP-LB, which negatively regulate IMD pathway activation. Loss of PGRP-LE-mediated detection of bacteria in the gut results in systemic immune activation, which can be rescued by overexpressing PGRP-LB in the gut. Together these data indicate that PGRP-LE functions as a master gut bacterial sensor that induces balanced responses to infectious bacteria and tolerance to microbiota.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22901536