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© Research
Publication : Journal of virology

Penetration of enveloped double-stranded RNA bacteriophages phi13 and phi6 into Pseudomonas syringae cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of virology - 01 Apr 2005

Daugelavicius R, Cvirkaite V, Gaidelyte A, Bakiene E, Gabrenaite-Verkhovskaya R, Bamford DH

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15795287

J. Virol. 2005 Apr;79(8):5017-26

Bacteriophages phi6 and phi13 are related enveloped double-stranded RNA viruses that infect gram-negative Pseudomonas syringae cells. phi6 uses a pilus as a receptor, and phi13 attaches to the host lipopolysaccharide. We compared the entry-related events of these two viruses, including receptor binding, envelope fusion, peptidoglycan penetration, and passage through the plasma membrane. The infection-related events are dependent on the multiplicity of infection in the case of phi13 but not with phi6. A temporal increase of host outer membrane permeability to lipophilic ions was observed from 1.5 to 4 min postinfection in both virus infections. This enhanced permeability period coincided with the fast dilution of octadecyl rhodamine B-labeled virus-associated lipid molecules. This result is in agreement with membrane fusion, and the presence of temporal virus-derived membrane patches on the outer membrane. Similar to phi6, phi13 contains a thermosensitive lytic enzyme involved in peptidoglycan penetration. The phage entry also caused a limited depolarization of the plasma membrane. Inhibition of host respiration considerably decreased the efficiency of irreversible virus binding and membrane fusion. An active role of cell energy metabolism in restoring the infection-induced defects in the cell envelope was also observed.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15795287