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© Research
Publication : Journal of molecular neuroscience : MN

Parkinson’s Disease Genetic Loci in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of molecular neuroscience : MN - 01 May 2015

Gan-Or Z, Girard SL, Noreau A, Leblond CS, Gagnon JF, Arnulf I, Mirarchi C, Dauvilliers Y, Desautels A, Mitterling T, Cochen De Cock V, Frauscher B, Monaca C, Hogl B, Dion PA, Postuma RB, Montplaisir JY, Rouleau GA

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 25929833

J. Mol. Neurosci. 2015 Jul;56(3):617-22

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a prodromal condition for Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other synucleinopathies, which often occurs many years before the onset of PD. We analyzed 261 RBD patients and 379 controls for nine PD-associated SNPs and examined their effects, first upon on RBD risk and second, on eventual progression to synucleinopathies in a prospective follow-up in a subset of patients. The SCARB2 rs6812193 (OR = 0.67, 95 % CI = 0.51-0.88, p = 0.004) and the MAPT rs12185268 (OR-0.43, 95 % CI-0.26-0.72, p = 0.001) were associated with RBD in different models. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in a subset of RBD patients (n = 56), demonstrated that homozygous carriers of the USP25 rs2823357 SNP had progressed to synucleinopathies faster than others (log-rank p = 0.003, Breslow p = 0.005, Tarone-Ware p = 0.004). As a proof-of-concept study, these results suggest that RBD may be associated with at least a subset of PD-associated genes, and demonstrate that combining genetic and prodromal clinical data may help identifying individuals that are either more or less susceptible to develop synucleinopathies. More studies are necessary to replicate these results, and identify more genetic factors affecting progression from RBD to synucleinopathies.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25929833