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© Research
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Overexpression of c-jun, junB, or junD affects cell growth differently

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 15 Oct 1991

Castellazzi M, Spyrou G, La Vista N, Dangy JP, Piu F, Yaniv M, Brun G

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 1924349

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1991 Oct;88(20):8890-4

The coding sequences of murine c-jun, junB, or junD, which code for proteins with practically identical dimerization and DNA binding properties, were introduced into a nondefective retroviral vector, and the phenotype of primary avian fibroblasts chronically infected with each of these viruses was studied. Cells expressing c-jun grew in low-serum medium and developed into colonies in agar, two properties characteristic of in vitro transformation. Cells expressing junB grew in agar, with a reduced efficiency as compared to c-jun, but did not grow in low-serum medium. Finally, no effect of junD expression on cell growth was observed. These different phenotypes suggest that these three closely related transcription factors play distinct roles during normal cell growth. Analysis of c-jun deletion mutants and of c-jun/junB and c-jun/junD chimeric genes showed that the N-terminal portion (amino acids 2-168) of the c-Jun protein that is involved in transcriptional activation is required for efficient transformation. On the contrary, cells expressing a truncated mouse c-Jun lacking this N-terminal domain grew slower than normal embryo fibroblasts. The reduced growth rate may be related to the finding that expression of the intact or the truncated mouse c-jun repressed the endogenous avian c-Jun homologue, suggesting that functional c-Jun product is required for normal cell growth.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1924349