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© Research
Publication : American journal of epidemiology

Optimizing the precision of case fatality ratio estimates under the surveillance pyramid approach

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in American journal of epidemiology - 25 Sep 2014

Pelat C, Ferguson NM, White PJ, Reed C, Finelli L, Cauchemez S, Fraser C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 25255809

Am. J. Epidemiol. 2014 Nov;180(10):1036-46

In the management of emerging infectious disease epidemics, precise and accurate estimation of severity indices, such as the probability of death after developing symptoms-the symptomatic case fatality ratio (sCFR)-is essential. Estimation of the sCFR may require merging data gathered through different surveillance systems and surveys. Since different surveillance strategies provide different levels of precision and accuracy, there is need for a theory to help investigators select the strategy that maximizes these properties. Here, we study the precision of sCFR estimators that combine data from several levels of the severity pyramid. We derive a formula for the standard error, which helps us find the estimator with the best precision given fixed resources. We further propose rules of thumb for guiding the choice of strategy: For example, should surveillance of a particular severity level be started? Which level should be preferred? We derive a formula for the optimal allocation of resources between chosen surveillance levels and provide a simple approximation that can be used in thinking more heuristically about planning surveillance. We illustrate these concepts with numerical examples corresponding to 3 influenza pandemic scenarios. Finally, we review the equally important issue of accuracy.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25255809