Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)

Ontogeny of the heavy chain immunoglobulin repertoire in fetal liver and bone marrow

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) - 01 Apr 1998

Delassus S, Darche S, Kourilsky P, Cumano A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 9531284

J. Immunol. 1998 Apr;160(7):3274-80

We studied the kinetics of maturation of B cell progenitors in the mouse embryo, from day 15 of development to birth, both in liver and bone marrow. The analysis of Ig heavy chain rearrangements at different time points of late fetal development shows that oligoclonal patterns of V(H)-D-J(H) rearrangements are detected by day 15 in fetal liver. The pattern is polyclonal and diverse by day 17; however, 80% of the rearrangements are nonproductive. In bone marrow, the pattern of rearrangements is less diverse at birth, although the percentage of nonproductive rearrangements approaches adult bone marrow levels (35-40%). After day 17 in fetal liver, there is a sudden reversal in the percentage of nonproductive rearrangements that reaches 33% at day 19 (birth). Maturation of B cells, as measured by the fraction of surface Ig+ in total B220+ cells and the presence of N sequence additions in V(H)-D-J(H) joints, occurs in the marrow before fetal liver. These results demonstrate that the lymphopoietic environment in fetal liver and bone marrow of animals at the same stage of development is functionally distinct.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9531284