Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Molecular & general genetics : MGG

Nucleotide sequence of the kanamycin resistance determinant of the pneumococcal transposon Tn1545: evolutionary relationships and transcriptional analysis of aphA-3 genes

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular & general genetics : MGG - 01 May 1987

Caillaud F, Trieu-Cuot P, Carlier C, Courvalin P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 3039302

Mol. Gen. Genet. 1987 May;207(2-3):509-13

The nucleotide sequence of the kanamycin resistance determinant aphA-3 encoded by transposon Tn1545 from Streptococcus pneumoniae was determined and compared to those of plasmids pJH1 and pIP1433 from Streptococcus faecalis and Campylobacter coli, respectively. The three sequences were found to be identical and differed by two substitutions and the deletion of a codon from that of plasmid pSH2 from Staphylococcus aureus. Comparison of the 5′ noncoding sequences indicated that the regions containing the aphA-3 gene in pJH1 and in Tn1545 evolved independently by deletion from a sequence similar to that found in pIP1433. In the latter plasmid, aphA-3 is transcribed from a promoter, P1, which is flanked by two 12-base pair direct repeats. The rearrangement observed in pJH1 removed one of these recombinogenic sites and altered the -10 and 3′ flanking sequences of P1. The promoter thus generated. P1′, allows expression of similar level of kanamycin resistance as P1. However, fusion experiments carried out with a promotorless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene indicated that the canonical promoter P1 is significantly less efficient than P1′. From analysis of the thermodynamic properties of these promoters, we conclude that this difference in strength reflects the melting properties of the -10 sequences. The transition from pIP1433 to pJH1 may correspond to the progression of a molecule structurally unstable to a more stable one combined with the need to maintain an efficient promoter upstream of the aphA-3 gene. The deletion event in Tn1545, which occurred between the two 12-base pair directly repeated sequences, removed P1 in its entirety.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3039302