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© K. Melican.
Human microvessel (red) colonized by N. meningitidis (green).
Publication : Experimental diabesity research

Noninvasive orthogonal polarization spectral imaging as applied to microvascular studies in mice

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Experimental diabesity research - 01 Jul 2004

Nivoit P, Chevrier AM, Lagarde M, Renaudin C, Wiernsperger N

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15512789

Exp. Diabesity Res. 2004 Jul-Sep;5(3):211-7

In vivo observations of the mouse microcirculation can hardly be performed due to technical difficulties, limiting the knowledge that could be obtained from gene manipulated mice models. The aim of the present study was to check the applicability of a novel optical system, the orthogonal polarization spectral technology, to study the mouse microcirculation. In anaesthetized mice, the spinotrapezius muscle microcirculation was observed in situ. The diameter of precapillary arterioles was measured before and after a pharmacological or hormonal stimulation. High-contrast images of the muscle microcirculation were obtained and significant vasodilatation of arterioles was observed after topical applications of acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and insulin. As compared to conventional techniques, orthogonal polarization spectral imaging makes it possible to assess and study microvascular beds in mice, which were inaccessible until now, allowing the use of gene manipulated mice to investigate, for example, the mechanisms involved in the development of diabetic microangiopathy.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15512789