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© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : The American journal of pathology

Noninvasive imaging technologies reveal edema toxin as a key virulence factor in anthrax

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The American journal of pathology - 01 Jun 2011

Dumetz F, Jouvion G, Khun H, Glomski IJ, Corre JP, Rougeaux C, Tang WJ, Mock M, Huerre M, Goossens PL

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21641378

Am. J. Pathol. 2011 Jun;178(6):2523-35

Powerful noninvasive imaging technologies enable real-time tracking of pathogen-host interactions in vivo, giving access to previously elusive events. We visualized the interactions between wild-type Bacillus anthracis and its host during a spore infection through bioluminescence imaging coupled with histology. We show that edema toxin plays a central role in virulence in guinea pigs and during inhalational infection in mice. Edema toxin (ET), but not lethal toxin (LT), markedly modified the patterns of bacterial dissemination leading, to apparent direct dissemination to the spleen and provoking apoptosis of lymphoid cells. Each toxin alone provoked particular histological lesions in the spleen. When ET and LT are produced together during infection, a specific temporal pattern of lesion developed, with early lesions typical of LT, followed at a later stage by lesions typical of ET. Our study provides new insights into the complex spatial and temporal effects of B. anthracis toxins in the infected host, suggesting a greater role than previously suspected for ET in anthrax and suggesting that therapeutic targeting of ET contributes to protection.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21641378