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© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)

Myeloid HIFs are dispensable for resolution of inflammation during skeletal muscle regeneration

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) - 06 Mar 2015

Gondin J, Théret M, Duhamel G, Pegan K, Mathieu JR, Peyssonnaux C, Cuvellier S, Latroche C, Chazaud B, Bendahan D, Mounier R

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 25750431

J. Immunol. 2015 Apr;194(7):3389-99

Besides their role in cellular responses to hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are involved in innate immunity and also have anti-inflammatory (M2) functions, such as resolution of inflammation preceding healing. Whereas the first steps of the inflammatory response are associated with proinflammatory (M1) macrophages (MPs), resolution of inflammation is associated with anti-inflammatory MPs exhibiting an M2 phenotype. This M1 to M2 sequence is observed during postinjury muscle regeneration, which provides an excellent paradigm to study the resolution of sterile inflammation. In this study, using in vitro and in vivo approaches in murine models, we demonstrated that deletion of hif1a or hif2a in MPs has no impact on the acquisition of an M2 phenotype. Furthermore, using a multiscale methodological approach, we showed that muscles did not require macrophagic hif1a or hif2a to regenerate. These results indicate that macrophagic HIFs do not play a crucial role during skeletal muscle regeneration induced by sterile tissue damage.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25750431