Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Valérie Choumet
Mosquitoes were orally infected with the chikungunya virus. Midguts were dissected at day 5 post-infection, fixed and permeabilised. Virus is shown in red (anti-E2 protein, cyanine 3), the actin network in green (phalloidin 548) and nuclei in blue (DAPI).
Publication : Bulletin de la Société de pathologie exotique (1990)

[Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex: phenotypic and genotypic markers and the molecular basis for interspecies transmission]

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Bulletin de la Société de pathologie exotique (1990) - 01 Jul 2000

Legrand E, Sola C, Rastogi N

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11030055

Bull Soc Pathol Exot 2000 Jul;93(3):182-92

The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) comprises a heterogeneous group of slowly-growing mycobacteria that are pathogenic for both humans and animals. Two genetically distinct species within MAC are M. avium, which tends to infect HIV-infected patients, and M. intracellulare more common among immunocompetent individuals. Contrary to M. intracellulare which relates to a single species, M. avium is separated into three subspecies; M. avium subsp. avium, a major opportunistic pathogen leading to a disseminated disease among terminal AIDS patients; M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, causing Johne’s disease among ruminants and implicated in Crohn’s disease among humans; and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, a pathogen affecting birds that may cause chronic enteritis among calves but has not yet been associated with human disease. With the exception of mycobactin-dependent growth of M. paratuberculosis, most of the biochemical and cultural tests cannot discriminate among the three subspecies of M. avium. However, recently developed molecular methods and fingerprinting of strains using insertion sequences allows not only to distinguish among them but also further to explore the polymorphism of human and animal isolates. Numerous studies have underlined the probable role of various ecological niches (water, dust, soil, pigs, poultry and ruminants etc.) as a possible source of contamination for AIDS patients. This paper reviews the phenotypic and genotypic markers and epidemiology of M. avium complex organisms and current knowledge of the molecular basis of of inter-species transmission.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11030055