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© Emeline Camand
Marquage par immunofluorescence d'astrocytes tumoraux ou astrocytomes (lignée cellulaire humaine U373), montrant en rouge, APC et en vert, la tubuline des microtubules. APC est un supresseur de tumeur qui est impliqué dans la polarisation des astrocytes normaux. La localisation d'APC est altérée dans des lignées de gliomes. Pour essayer de corriger, les dérèglements observés lors de la migration des cellules d'astrocytes tumuraux ou gliomes on cherche à connaitre les mécanismes moléculaires fondamentaux qui controlent la polarisation et la migration cellulaire.
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Molecular crowding creates traffic jams of kinesin motors on microtubules

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 19 Mar 2012

Leduc C*, Padberg-Gehle K*, Varga V*, Helbing D, Diez S, Howard J

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22431622

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2012 Apr;109(16):6100-5

Despite the crowdedness of the interior of cells, microtubule-based motor proteins are able to deliver cargoes rapidly and reliably throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that motor proteins may be adapted to operate in crowded environments by having molecular properties that prevent them from forming traffic jams. To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted high-density traffic of purified kinesin-8 motor protein, a highly processive motor with long end-residency time, along microtubules in a total internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy assay. We found that traffic jams, characterized by an abrupt increase in the density of motors with an associated abrupt decrease in motor speed, form even in the absence of other obstructing proteins. To determine the molecular properties that lead to jamming, we altered the concentration of motors, their processivity, and their rate of dissociation from microtubule ends. Traffic jams occurred when the motor density exceeded a critical value (density-induced jams) or when motor dissociation from the microtubule ends was so slow that it resulted in a pileup (bottleneck-induced jams). Through comparison of our experimental results with theoretical models and stochastic simulations, we characterized in detail under which conditions density- and bottleneck-induced traffic jams form or do not form. Our results indicate that transport kinesins, such as kinesin-1, may be evolutionarily adapted to avoid the formation of traffic jams by moving only with moderate processivity and dissociating rapidly from microtubule ends.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22431622