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© Christine Schmitt, Meriem El Ghachi, Jean-Marc Panaud
Bactérie Helicobacter pylori en microscopie électronique à balayage. Agent causal de pathologies de l'estomac : elle est responsable des gastrites chroniques, d'ulcères gastriques et duodénaux et elle joue un rôle important dans la genèse des cancers gastriques (adénocarcinomes et lymphomes).
Publication : Nature communications

Molecular architecture of the PBP2-MreC core bacterial cell wall synthesis complex

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Nature communications - 03 Oct 2017

Contreras-Martel C, Martins A, Ecobichon C, Trindade DM, Matteï PJ, Hicham S, Hardouin P, Ghachi ME, Boneca IG, Dessen A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28974686

Nat Commun 2017 10;8(1):776

Bacterial cell wall biosynthesis is an essential process that requires the coordinated activity of peptidoglycan biosynthesis enzymes within multi-protein complexes involved in cell division (the “divisome”) and lateral wall growth (the “elongasome”). MreC is a structural protein that serves as a platform during wall elongation, scaffolding other essential peptidoglycan biosynthesis macromolecules, such as penicillin-binding proteins. Despite the importance of these multi-partite complexes, details of their architecture have remained elusive due to the transitory nature of their interactions. Here, we present the crystal structures of the soluble PBP2:MreC core elongasome complex from Helicobacter pylori, and of uncomplexed PBP2. PBP2 recognizes the two-winged MreC molecule upon opening of its N-terminal region, revealing a hydrophobic zipper that serves as binding platform. The PBP2:MreC interface is essential both for protein recognition in vitro and maintenance of bacterial shape and growth. This work allows visualization as to how peptidoglycan machinery proteins are scaffolded, revealing interaction regions that could be targeted by tailored inhibitors.Bacterial wall biosynthesis is a complex process that requires the coordination of multiple enzymes. Here, the authors structurally characterize the PBP2:MreC complex involved in peptidoglycan elongation and cross-linking, and demonstrate that its disruption leads to loss of H. pylori shape and inability to sustain growth.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28974686