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© Research
Publication : American journal of physiology. Cell physiology

Modulation of P2Z/P2X(7) receptor activity in macrophages infected with Chlamydia psittaci

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in American journal of physiology. Cell physiology - 01 Jan 2001

Coutinho-Silva R, Perfettini JL, Persechini PM, Dautry-Varsat A, Ojcius DM

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11121379

Am. J. Physiol., Cell Physiol. 2001 Jan;280(1):C81-9

Given the role that extracellular ATP (ATP(o))-mediated apoptosis may play in inflammatory responses and in controlling mycobacterial growth in macrophages, we investigated whether ATP(o) has any effect on the viability of chlamydiae in macrophages and, conversely, whether the infection has any effect on susceptibility to ATP(o)-induced killing via P2Z/P2X(7) purinergic receptors. Apoptosis of J774 macrophages could be selectively triggered by ATP(o), because other purine/pyrimidine nucleotides were ineffective, and it was inhibited by oxidized ATP, which irreversibly inhibits P2Z/P2X(7) purinergic receptors. Incubation with ATP(o) but not other extracellular nucleotides inhibits the growth of intracellular chlamydiae, consistent with previous observations on ATP(o) effects on growth of intracellular mycobacteria. However, chlamydial infection for 1 day also inhibits ATP(o)-mediated apoptosis, which may be a mechanism to partially protect infected cells against the immune response. Infection by Chlamydia appears to protect cells by decreasing the ability of ATP(o) to permeabilize macrophages to small molecules and by abrogating a sustained Ca(2+) influx previously associated with ATP(o)-induced apoptosis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11121379