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© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : Molecular psychiatry

Mast cells’ involvement in inflammation pathways linked to depression: evidence in mastocytosis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular psychiatry - 26 Jan 2016

Georgin-Lavialle S, Moura DS, Salvador A, Chauvet-Gelinier JC, Launay JM, Damaj G, Côté F, Soucié E, Chandesris MO, Barète S, Grandpeix-Guyodo C, Bachmeyer C, Alyanakian MA, Aouba A, Lortholary O, Dubreuil P, Teyssier JR, Trojak B, Haffen E, Vandel P, Bonin B, , Hermine O, Gaillard R

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 26809839

Mol. Psychiatry 2016 Jan;

Converging sources of evidence point to a role for inflammation in the development of depression, fatigue and cognitive dysfunction. More precisely, the tryptophan (TRP) catabolism is thought to play a major role in inflammation-induced depression. Mastocytosis is a rare disease in which chronic symptoms, including depression, are related to mast cell accumulation and activation. Our objectives were to study the correlations between neuropsychiatric features and the TRP catabolism pathway in mastocytosis in order to demonstrate mast cells’ potential involvement in inflammation-induced depression. Fifty-four patients with mastocytosis and a mean age of 50.1 years were enrolled in the study and compared healthy age-matched controls. Depression and stress were evaluated with the Beck Depression Inventory revised and the Perceived Stress Scale. All patients had measurements of TRP, serotonin (5-HT), kynurenine (KYN), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity (ratio KYN/TRP), kynurenic acid (KA) and quinolinic acid (QA). Patients displayed significantly lower levels of TRP and 5-HT without hypoalbuminemia or malabsorption, higher IDO1 activity, and higher levels of KA and QA, with an imbalance towards the latter. High perceived stress and high depression scores were associated with low TRP and high IDO1 activity. In conclusion, TRP metabolism is altered in mastocytosis and correlates with perceived stress and depression, demonstrating mast cells’ involvement in inflammation pathways linked to depression.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 26 January 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2015.216.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26809839