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© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : Clinical imaging

Management of cervical cancer detected during pregnancy: role of magnetic resonance imaging

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Clinical imaging - 08 Jun 2012

Balleyguier C, Fournet C, Ben Hassen W, Zareski E, Morice P, Haie-Meder C, Uzan C, Gouy S, Duvillard P, Lhommé C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23206610

Clin Imaging 2013 Jan-Feb;37(1):70-6

OBJECTIVE: The aims of the present study were to assess the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the staging and follow-up of uterine cervical cancers discovered during pregnancy and to evaluate the role of MRI in decision making regarding treatment options for patients with uterine cervical cancer during pregnancy.

METHOD: Twelve pregnant women with cervical cancer were included. Two populations of patients were distinguished: localized cervical cancer discovered on the Pap smear during the first trimester of pregnancy, at an early stage (n=5), and invasive cervical cancer revealed later, during the second or third trimester (n=7). Abdominal and pelvic MRI sequences were acquired with a phased-array coil. Magnetic resonance results were correlated with the physical examination, Pap smear, and pathology.

RESULTS: In the first population, MRI was normal or detected a small lesion (stage IB1), and pregnancies were allowed to continue. In the second population, MRI detected a lesion in every case (mean size, 62 mm; 30-110 mm), and positive lymph nodes were depicted in 2 cases. The pregnancy was interrupted in four patients: one interruption in localized cervical cancer group and three in invasive cervical group). In all other cases, a cesarean section was done after the 30th week. In one case, MRI assessed response after chemotherapy administered during pregnancy.

CONCLUSION: MRI is an essential examination for planning the treatment of cervical cancers diagnosed during pregnancy.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23206610