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© A-M. Pais-Correia, M-I. Thoulouze, A. Alcover, A. Gessain
Mise en évidence de structures de type "biofilm ", formées par le rétrovirus HTLV-1 générés par des cellules infectées (cellules du haut), qui ont été transmis à un autre lymphocyte (cellule du bas). Micrographie en microscopie électronique à balayage. Image colorisée.
Publication : Developmental cell

LTB4 is a signal-relay molecule during neutrophil chemotaxis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Developmental cell - 26 Apr 2012

Afonso PV, Janka-Junttila M, Lee YJ, McCann CP, Oliver CM, Aamer KA, Losert W, Cicerone MT, Parent CA

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22542839

Dev. Cell 2012 May;22(5):1079-91

Neutrophil recruitment to inflammation sites purportedly depends on sequential waves of chemoattractants. Current models propose that leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), a secondary chemoattractant secreted by neutrophils in response to primary chemoattractants such as formyl peptides, is important in initiating the inflammation process. In this study we demonstrate that LTB(4) plays a central role in neutrophil activation and migration to formyl peptides. We show that LTB(4) production dramatically amplifies formyl peptide-mediated neutrophil polarization and chemotaxis by regulating specific signaling pathways acting upstream of actin polymerization and MyoII phosphorylation. Importantly, by analyzing the migration of neutrophils isolated from wild-type mice and mice lacking the formyl peptide receptor 1, we demonstrate that LTB(4) acts as a signal to relay information from cell to cell over long distances. Together, our findings imply that LTB(4) is a signal-relay molecule that exquisitely regulates neutrophil chemotaxis to formyl peptides, which are produced at the core of inflammation sites.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22542839