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© Nadia Naffakh, Institut Pasteur
Immunofluorescence detection of influenza virus nucleoprotein in infected cells
Publication : Human gene therapy

Long-term secretion of therapeutic proteins from genetically modified skeletal muscles

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Human gene therapy - 01 Jan 1996

Naffakh N, Pinset C, Montarras D, Li Z, Paulin D, Danos O, Heard JM

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 8825864

Hum. Gene Ther. 1996 Jan;7(1):11-21

Protein delivery from genetically modified skeletal muscle has been reported previously. However, a stable and prolonged secretion was obtained in immunocompromised or newborn animals only. To evaluate the clinical relevance of this approach, we have transduced myoblasts from an adult beta-glucuronidase-deficient (MPS VII) mouse with retroviral vectors carrying either the human beta-glucuronidase cDNA or the murine erythropoietin (Epo) cDNA. The cells were then grafted into the tibialis anterior muscle of adult immunocompetent MPS VII recipients. Protein expression was controlled either by ubiquitous or muscle-specific transcriptional regulatory elements. Animals were analyzed over an 8-month period. The in situ detection of beta-glucuronidase activity revealed up to 60% of genetically modified myofibers in the recipient muscles. The human desmin promoter and enhancer showed the highest in vivo expression. Secretion of beta-glucuronidase induced a disappearance of lysosomal storage lesions in the liver and spleen of recipient animals. Delivery of Epo led to a permanent increase of hematocrit values over 3 months. These results showed that the transplantation of genetically modified myoblasts allowed a sustained secretion of recombinant proteins at therapeutic levels in immunocompetent adult mice. They suggest that the approach may be considered for human applications.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8825864