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© Research
Publication : Bone marrow transplantation

Legionnaires’ disease after bone marrow transplantation

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Bone marrow transplantation - 01 Oct 1987

Meletis J, Arlet G, Dournon E, Pol S, Devergie A, Sportes C, Peraldi MN, Mayaud C, Perol Y, Gluckman E

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 3332177

Bone Marrow Transplant. 1987 Oct;2(3):307-13

Four patients developed legionnaires’ disease after bone marrow transplantation. Two cases occurred early after transplant and were considered as part of a hospital epidemic due to contamination of water supply. The other two cases were considered to be sporadic because they occurred 3-4 weeks after hospital discharge. The outcome was good in two patients. In the third patient, recurrent disease was probably due to acquired resistance to macrolides, and complete cure was achieved after treatment with pefloxacin and rifampicin. The fourth patient died of overwhelming infection despite early treatment with erythromycin and pefloxacin. During the same period we treated 14 patients with pefloxacin for prevention of bacterial infection, of whom none developed Legionella pneumophila infection, while three of the patients reported here were in a group of 11 patients who received only oral non-absorbable antibiotics for gut decontamination. The fourth patient in this report was receiving no antibiotics. Thus pefloxacin seems to be effective as prophylaxis against L. pneumophila infection. When the hospital water supply was heated to 60 degrees C and chlorinated, the nosocomial cases in the hospital completely disappeared.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3332177