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© Research
Publication : Biochemistry

Kinetic characterization of the pH-dependent oligomerization of R67 dihydrofolate reductase

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Biochemistry - 10 Jul 2001

Méjean A, Bodenreider C, Schuerer K, Goldberg ME

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11434787

Biochemistry 2001 Jul;40(27):8169-79

Protein-protein recognition results from the assembly of complementary surfaces on two molecules that form a stable, noncovalent, specific complex. Our interest was to describe kinetic aspects of the recognition in order to understand the subtle molecular mechanism of association. R67 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) provides an ideal model to investigate kinetic parameters of protein-protein association since it is a homotetramer resulting from the pH-dependent dimerization of homodimers. We took advantage of the presence of a tryptophan residue at the dimer-dimer interface to monitor pH-dependent oligomerization of R67 DHFR using stopped-flow fluorescence techniques. Except for pH near neutrality where dissociation exhibited biphasic kinetics, association and dissociation followed monophasic kinetics fitted on a two-state model. Apparent rate constants of association k(on) and dissociation k(off) were determined at various pHs and pointed to the key role of a histidine located at the dimer-dimer interface in the pH control of tetramerization. The values of the tetramer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant were calculated from the ratio k(off) /k(on) and correlated well with those previously measured at equilibrium. The thermodynamic parameters and the activation energies of both the association and dissociation were determined and indicated that the association is enthalpy driven and suggested that the formation of four hydrogen bonds (one per monomer) is responsible for the thermodynamic stability of the tetramer. Detailed analysis of the biphasic kinetics led to an original model, in which protonation of the tetramer is the triggering event for the dissociation process while the association involves primarily the unprotonated dimers.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11434787