Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Physical chemistry chemical physics : PCCP

Investigation of the Soret effect in aqueous and non-aqueous mixtures by the thermal lens technique

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Physical chemistry chemical physics : PCCP - 28 Nov 2008

Polyakov P, Wiegand S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 19290334

Phys Chem Chem Phys 2009 Feb;11(5):864-71

In the present work we investigate the thermal diffusion behavior of three different binary mixtures with a thermal lens (TL) setup. In the setup used in this study we avoid the addition of a dye for systems, such as aqueous mixtures, with a weak absorption band at a wavelength of 980 nm. In some aqueous systems with a complex phase behavior the addition of dye significantly affects the apparent measured thermal diffusion properties. The studied systems are dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in water, the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate (EMIES) in butanol and a non-ionic surfactant hexaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C(12)E(6)) in water. The Soret coefficients of the selected systems cover a range of two orders of magnitude. For DMSO in water with a very low Soret coefficient of the order of S(T) approximately 10(-3) K(-1) we find for a low DMSO content (c = 0.33) a reasonable agreement with previous measurements, while the weak thermal lens signal for the DMSO-rich mixture (c = 0.87) leads to 20% too large Soret coefficients with an uncertainty of more than 30%. Secondly we studied a liquid salt 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate (EMIES) in butanol with a roughly ten times higher Soret coefficient of S(T) approximately 10(-2) K(-1). For this system we performed additional measurements with another experimental technique, the classical thermal diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering (TDFRS), which requires the addition of a small amount of dye to increase the absorption. In the entire investigated concentration range the results obtained with the TL and classical TDFRS technique agree within the error bars. As a third system we studied a non-ionic surfactant hexaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C(12)E(6)) in water with a Soret coefficient of the order of S(T) approximately 10(-1) K(-1). For this system we find good agreement with previous measurements. We conclude that the TL technique is a reliable method for systems with a strong optical contrast and fairly large Soret coefficient of the order of S(T) approximately 10(-2) K(-1).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19290334