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© Perrine Bomme, Guillaume Duménil, Jean-Marc Panaud.
Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Neisseria meningitidis on epithelial cells
Publication : The EMBO journal

Intimate adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to human epithelial cells is under the control of the crgA gene, a novel LysR-type transcriptional regulator

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The EMBO journal - 01 Mar 2000

Deghmane AE, Petit S, Topilko A, Pereira Y, Giorgini D, Larribe M, Taha MK

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10698947

EMBO J. 2000 Mar;19(5):1068-78

PilC1, a pilus-associated protein in Neisseria menin- gitidis, is a key element in initial meningococcal adhesion to target cells. A promoter element (CREN, contact regulatory element of Neisseria) is responsible for the transient induction of this gene upon cell contact. crgA (contact-regulated gene A) encodes a transcriptional regulator whose expression is also induced upon cell contact from a promoter region similar to the CREN of pilC1. CrgA shows significant sequence homologies to LysR-type transcriptional regulators. Its inactivation in meningococci provokes a dramatic reduction in bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Moreover, this mutant is unable to undergo intimate adhesion to epithelial cells or to provoke effacing of microvilli on infected cells. Purified CrgA is able to bind to pilC1 and crgA promoters, and CrgA seems to repress the expression of pilC1 and crgA. Our results support a dynamic model of bacteria-cell interaction involving a network of regulators acting in cascade. CrgA could be an intermediate regulator in such a network.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10698947