Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Valérie Choumet
Mosquitoes were orally infected with the chikungunya virus. Midguts were dissected at day 5 post-infection, fixed and permeabilised. Virus is shown in red (anti-E2 protein, cyanine 3), the actin network in green (phalloidin 548) and nuclei in blue (DAPI).
Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene - 01 Dec 2004

Talman AM, Paul RE, Sokhna CS, Domarle O, Ariey F, Trape JF, Robert V

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15642963

Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 2004 Dec;71(6):739-44

Plasmodium species, the etiologic agents of malaria, are obligatory sexual organisms. Gametocytes, the precursors of gametes, are responsible for parasite transmission from human to mosquito. The sex ratio of gametocytes has been shown to have consequences for the success of this shift from vertebrate host to insect vector. We attempted to document the effect of chemotherapy on the sex ratio of two different Plasmodium species: Plasmodium falciparum in children from endemic area with uncomplicated malaria treated with chloroquine (CQ) or sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), and P. vinckei petteri in mice treated with CQ or untreated. The studies involved 53 patients without gametocytes at day 0 (13 CQ and 40 SP) followed for 14 days, and 15 mice (10 CQ and 5 controls) followed for five days. During the course of infection, a positive correlation was observed between the time of the length of infection and the proportion of male gametocytes in both Plasmodium species. No effects of treatment (CQ versus SP for P. falciparum or CQ versus controls for P. vinckei petteri) on the gametocyte sex ratio were found for either Plasmodium species. This indicates that parasites do not respond to chemotherapy by altering their sex allocation strategy, even though, in the case of P. falciparum, they apparently increase their overall investment in sexual stages. This suggests that malaria parasite species respond to different environmental cues for their sex differentiation and sex determination.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15642963