Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : FEMS immunology and medical microbiology

In vivo induction of CTL responses by recombinant adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis carrying multiple copies of a viral CD8(+) T-cell epitope

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in FEMS immunology and medical microbiology - 01 Nov 1999

Sebo P, Moukrim Z, Kalhous M, Schaft N, Dadaglio G, Sheshko V, Fayolle C, Leclerc C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10536304

FEMS Immunol. Med. Microbiol. 1999 Nov;26(2):167-73

Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is one of the few known protein toxins penetrating directly into the cytosol of target cells across their cytoplasmic membrane without the need for endocytosis. This capacity of ACT was recently exploited for in vivo delivery of single viral CD8(+) T-epitopes into MHC class I-presenting cells and induction of protective antiviral cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses. Here, we have explored the potential of the cell-invasive adenylate cyclase domain of the toxin to deliver larger antigens by evaluating the epitope-specific CTL responses induced by constructs bearing one to four copies of the CD8(+) T-epitope from the nucleoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The increase in the number of copies of the epitope was accompanied by a moderate decrease of the specific cell invasiveness of the ACT protein and did not lead to further enhancement of the level of induced epitope-specific CTL cells in mice, as compared to ACT with a single copy of the epitope. These results demonstrate the capacity of ACT to deliver larger heterologous antigens comprising several epitopes for antigenic presentation in vivo.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10536304