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© Research
Publication : Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)

Hemorrhage produces abnormalities in lymphocyte function and lymphokine generation

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) - 01 Feb 1989

Abraham E, Freitas AA

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 2492333

J. Immunol. 1989 Feb;142(3):899-906

Hemorrhage has been shown to produce abnormalities in lymphocyte function, particularly in the proliferative response to mitogens such as PHA and Con A. In order to better examine the hemorrhage-induced alterations in immune function, we determined the effects of blood loss in mice without any surgical manipulation on lymphocyte populations and subpopulations, cellular activation, and lymphokine production. Hemorrhage induced no changes in cell numbers in the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, and bone marrow. No alterations in the relative percentages of B (B220+, mu+) and T (Lyt-1+, Lyt-2+, T3+, L3T4+) cell subpopulations were found in any organ after blood loss. Significant decreases in splenocyte proliferation in response to Con A, IL-2R expression and blast formation occurred after hemorrhage. IFN-gamma production increased 24 and 48 h post hemorrhage. Decreases in IL-2, IL-3, and IL-5 generation were present 2 h after blood loss. IL-2 production remained significantly decreased for 48 h posthemorrhage, then increased to more than twice normal levels 72 h posthemorrhage, and subsequently returned to prehemorrhage values. These results demonstrate that hemorrhage produces widespread alterations in immune function without affecting lymphocyte population and subpopulation numbers.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2492333