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© Michel-Robert Popoff
Clostridium difficile en microscopie à contraste de phase. On distingue des bactéries sporulées, non sporulées et d'autres en cours de lyse (destruction). Bactérie de l'environnement (sol, eau, foin, sable), elle est à l'origine d'infections nosocomiales survenant après un traitement antibiotique : Clostridium difficile prédomine alors que les autres bactéries de la flore intestinale ont été détruites. L'infection peut provoquer deux types de pathologies graves : les colites pseudo-membraneuses dont l'origine est quasiment due à 100 % à C. difficile et la diarrhée post-antibiothérapie due à C. difficile dans 30 % des cas de ces diarrhées.
Publication : Pflügers Archiv : European journal of physiology

Global analysis of gene expression in mammalian kidney

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Pflügers Archiv : European journal of physiology - 21 Dec 2004

Soutourina O, Cheval L, Doucet A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15611884

Pflugers Arch. 2005 Apr;450(1):13-25

The past decade has seen the achievement of sequencing of human, rat and mouse genomes and the development of high-throughput methods for quantitative monitoring of gene expression. The aim of the beginning post-genomic era is to determine the function of all these genes, a challenge in which the community of physiologists should have a leading role. In this short review, we discuss the relevance, feasibility and impact of transcriptome analysis in renal physiology. Comparison of transcriptomes demonstrates that cell lines are poor physiological models, making it necessary to work on native kidney tissue. Palliating kidney heterogeneity therefore requires the development of methods for transcriptome analysis sensitive enough to be compatible with microdissected nephron segments. Axial comparison of transcriptomes along the human nephron unexpectedly points out that the segmentation of nephrons concerns not only genes involved in solute and water transport functions and their regulation, but also genes related to the control of cell division, differentiation and apoptosis. Comparison of transcriptome of a same nephron segment from mice under different pathophysiological conditions outlines the wide pleiotropy of kidney function regulations. Both types of comparative studies also identify yet unknown transcripts specifically expressed along the nephron or under pathophysiological conditions.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15611884