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© Research
Publication : Tumour biology : the journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine

Frequent alterations of the beta-catenin protein in cancer of the uterine cervix

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Tumour biology : the journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine - 01 Jan 2002

Pereira-Suárez AL, Meraz MA, Lizano M, Estrada-Chávez C, Hernández F, Olivera P, Pérez E, Padilla P, Yaniv M, Thierry F, García-Carrancá A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11893906

Tumour Biol. 2002 Jan-Feb;23(1):45-53

Cancer of the uterine cervix is still the leading cause of death among women with cancer in developing countries. Although infections with human papillomavirus are necessary, other molecular alterations that are needed at the cellular level for development of these tumors remain largely unknown. Beta-catenin is a key regulator located within the Wnt signaling cascade whose alterations constitute an important event in colon carcinogenesis. In many malignancies increased levels of the beta-catenin protein have been found, associated with its nuclear and/or cytoplasmic accumulation. To search for possible alterations of this pathway we examined the expression and localization of the beta-catenin protein in tumors from the uterine cervix and cell lines derived from them. Beta-catenin was found accumulated in the cytoplasm and/or nuclei of 12 out of 32 samples. In accordance, increased levels of this protein were observed in 9 out of 20 tumors analyzed. Importantly, PCR-SSCP and sequence analysis showed no mutations in exons 3, 4 and 6 of the beta-catenin gene. Our findings indicate that alterations of beta-catenin are frequent in these tumors and suggest that they may play an important role in the development of cancer of the uterine cervix. They also indicate that higher protein levels and abnormal localization may result from several different mechanisms.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11893906