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© Research
Publication : International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology

Evolution of the gyrB gene and the molecular phylogeny of Enterobacteriaceae: a model molecule for molecular systematic studies

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology - 01 Mar 2002

Dauga C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11931166

Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 2002 Mar;52(Pt 2):531-47

Phylogenetic trees showing the evolutionary relatedness of Enterobacteriaceae based upon gyrB and 16S rRNA genes were compared. Congruence among trees of these molecules indicates that the genomes of these species are not completely mosaic and that molecular systematic studies can be carried out. Phylogenetic trees based on gyrB sequences appeared to be more reliable at determining relationships among Serratia species than trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. gyrB sequences from Serratia species formed a monophyletic group validated by significant bootstrap values. Serratia fonticola had the most deeply branching gyrB sequence in the Serratia monophyletic group, which was consistent with its atypical phenotypic characteristics. Klebsiella and Enterobacter genera seemed to be polyphyletic, but the branching patterns of gyrB and 16S rRNA gene trees were not congruent. Enterobacter aerogenes was grouped with Klebsiella pneumoniae on the gyrB phylogenetic tree, which supports that this species could be transferred to the Klebsiella genus. Unfortunately, 16S rRNA and gyrB phylogenetic trees gave conflicting evolutionary relationships for Citrobacter freundii because of its unusual gyrB evolutionary process. gyrB lateral gene transfer was suspected for Hafnia alvei. Saturation of gyrB genes was observed by the pairwise comparison of Proteus spp., Providencia alcalifaciens and Morganella morganii sequences. Depending on their level of variability, 16S rRNA gene sequences were useful for describing phylogenetic relationships between distantly related Enterobacteriaceae, whereas gyrB sequence comparison was useful for inferring intra- and some intergeneric relationships.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11931166