Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Institut Pasteur
Macrophages et lymphocytes de souris. Image colorisée.
Publication : Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)

Embryonic thymic epithelium naturally devoid of APCs is acutely rejected in the absence of indirect recognition

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) - 01 Nov 2001

Pimenta-Araujo R, Mascarell L, Huesca M, Cumano A, Bandeira A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11673512

J. Immunol. 2001 Nov;167(9):5034-41

Transplants of tissues depleted of passenger leukocytes are upon in vitro culture usually accepted in allogeneic recipients. Accordingly, fully allogeneic embryonic thymic epithelium was suggested to be poorly immunogenic. However, this tissue is capable of inducing donor-specific tolerance to peripheral tissues, when restoring T cell development in nude mice, through the production of regulatory cells. In the present work, adult immunocompetent allogeneic recipients were grafted with embryonic tissues isolated at stages before hemopoietic colonization or even before the establishment of circulation. Allogeneic thymic epithelium of day 10 embryos and heart primordium of day 8 embryonic donors were always rejected. Acute rejection of the thymic anlagen takes place in less than 12 days, with maximal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltrates at 10 days post-transplant. In addition, a significant infiltrate of NK1.1(+) cells is observed, although without any essential role in this process. Furthermore, recipients lacking the indirect pathway of Ag presentation to CD4(+) T cells do not reveal any significant delay in rejection, even when CD8(+) T cells are also eliminated. Thus, our experimental approach reveals acute allograft rejection in the absence of all known pathways of naive T cell activation and therefore unveils a novel graft rejection mechanism that should be mediated by direct recognition of parenchymal cells. Given the importance of dendritic cells in naive T cell activation, it is likely that cross-reactive memory T cells may also drive rejection.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11673512