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© K. Melican.
Human microvessel (red) colonized by N. meningitidis (green).
Publication : Diabetologia

Effect of glycated LDL on microvascular tone in mice: a comparative study with LDL modified in vitro or isolated from diabetic patients

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Diabetologia - 24 Oct 2003

Nivoit P, Wiernsperger N, Moulin P, Lagarde M, Renaudin C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 14576982

Diabetologia 2003 Nov;46(11):1550-8

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In vitro studies have suggested that glycation of LDL might be implicated in diabetic microangiopathy. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of LDL glycated in vitro on the mouse skeletal muscle arteriolar tone. Since glycation naturally occurs during diabetes, we also tested the effects of LDL isolated from diabetic patients.

METHODS: In anaesthetized mice, the spinotrapezius muscle microcirculation was observed, in situ, using the orthogonal polarization spectral imaging technology. The diameter of terminal (<20 microm) and small arterioles (20-40 microm) was measured before and after a bolus intravenous injection of glycated LDL followed by a continuous perfusion (115 micro g/kg/min).

RESULTS: A slight decrease of terminal and small arterioles diameter (15%), which was further increased when highly glycated LDL was perfused (>22%). LDL isolated from diabetic patients mimicked the vasoconstriction obtained with in vitro mildly glycated LDL, which underwent similar glycation as those isolated from diabetic patients.

CONCLUSION/INTERPRETATION: Our results show in vivo that acute perfusion of both types of glycated LDL (artificially or naturally modified), cause major microvascular modification by enhancing arteriolar tone in skeletal muscle. These findings highlight a new role of glycated LDL at the level of microvessels. We suggest that glycation of LDL could contribute to the impaired vascular reactivity observed in diabetes.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14576982