Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Institut Pasteur
Cells infected for 24 hrs with C. Trachomatis. The cell nuclei are labelled in blue, the bacteria appear yellow, within the inclusion lumen. A bacterial protein secreted out the inclusion into the host cytoplasm id labelled in red.
Publication : Current drug targets

Drug Target Validation Methods in Malaria – Protein Interference Assay (PIA) as a Tool for Highly Specific Drug Target Validation.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Current drug targets - 01 Jan 2017

Meissner KA, Lunev S, Wang YZ, Linzke M, de Assis Batista F, Wrenger C, Groves MR,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 26844557

Link to DOI – 10.2174/1389450117666160201115003

Curr Drug Targets 2017 ; 18(9): 1069-1085

The validation of drug targets in malaria and other human diseases remains a highly difficult and laborious process. In the vast majority of cases, highly specific small molecule tools to inhibit a proteins function in vivo are simply not available. Additionally, the use of genetic tools in the analysis of malarial pathways is challenging. These issues result in difficulties in specifically modulating a hypothetical drug target’s function in vivo.The current “toolbox” of various methods and techniques to identify a protein’s function in vivo remains very limited and there is a pressing need for expansion. New approaches are urgently required to support target validation in the drug discovery process.Oligomerisation is the natural assembly of multiple copies of a single protein into one object and this self-assembly is present in more than half of all protein structures. Thus, oligomerisation plays a central role in the generation of functional biomolecules. A key feature of oligomerisation is that the oligomeric interfaces between the individual parts of the final assembly are highly specific. However, these interfaces have not yet been systematically explored or exploited to dissect biochemical pathways in vivo.This mini review will describe the current state of the antimalarial toolset as well as the potentially druggable malarial pathways. A specific focus is drawn to the initial efforts to exploit oligomerisation surfaces in drug target validation. As alternative to the conventional methods, Protein Interference Assay (PIA) can be used for specific distortion of the target protein function and pathway assessment in vivo.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26844557