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© Research
Publication : The European journal of neuroscience

Distinct patterns of discrimination and orienting for temporal processing of speech and nonspeech in Chinese children with autism: an event-related potential study.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The European journal of neuroscience - 01 Mar 2018

Huang D, Yu L, Wang X, Fan Y, Wang S, Zhang Y,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28833760

Link to DOI – 10.1111/ejn.13657

Eur J Neurosci 2018 03; 47(6): 662-668

Although many studies have reported domain-general impaired duration perception for speech and nonspeech sounds in children with autism, it remained unclear whether this phenomenon is universally applicable regardless of language background. In some languages such as Finnish and Japanese, vowel duration serves a phonemic role that can signify semantic distinction, and in others (e.g., Mandarin Chinese), vowel duration does not carry this phonemic function. The present event-related potential study investigated neural sensitivity to duration contrasts in speech and nonspeech contexts in Mandarin-speaking children with autism and a control group of age-matched typically developing (TD) children. A passive oddball paradigm was adopted to elicit the mismatch negativity (MMN) and involuntary orienting response (P3a) for change detection. A pure tone condition and a vowel condition were used. The MMN results showed that the autism group had diminished response amplitude and delayed latency in the pure tone condition compared to the TD group, whereas no group difference was found in the vowel condition. The P3a results showed no significant between-group MMN difference in the pure tone condition. In the vowel condition, the autism group had smaller P3a than the TD group. Together, the distinct patterns of discrimination and orienting responses for duration contrasts in pure tones and vowels are consistent with the ‘allophonic perception’ theory for autism, which may reflect a compromised perceptual weighting system for speech learning.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28833760