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© Nadia Naffakh, Institut Pasteur
Immunofluorescence detection of influenza virus nucleoprotein in infected cells
Publication : Blood

Disappearance of lysosomal storage in spleen and liver of mucopolysaccharidosis VII mice after transplantation of genetically modified bone marrow cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Blood - 15 Aug 1993

Maréchal V, Naffakh N, Danos O, Heard JM

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 8353294

Blood 1993 Aug;82(4):1358-65

Mice homozygous for the gusmps allele lack beta-glucuronidase activity and provide a useful model for human Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII), also known as Sly syndrome. Bone marrow (BM) transplantation was shown to correct the metabolic defect and to increase the life span of diseased animals. We have used this murine model in a preclinical study aimed at evaluating whether the techniques currently available for gene transfer into large mammalian and human BM cells will provide efficient enzyme replacement therapy in MPS patients. Autologous BM was transplanted into deficient mice after retrovirus-mediated transfer of the human beta-glucuronidase cDNA. Conditioning of recipients was performed by a single sublethal irradiation of 4.5 Gy, giving rise to low donor engraftment. In recipient mice analyzed until 145 days after gene transfer, the percentage of genetically modified hematopoietic cells was less than 5%. Nevertheless, beta-glucuronidase enzyme activity was detectable in various organs, including the brain, and disappearance of lysosomal storage was obvious in the liver and spleen. These results show that the autologous transplantation of genetically engineered BM cells could be beneficial in MPS patients.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8353294