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© Research
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Differentiation and characterization of B-cell precursors detected in the yolk sac and embryo body of embryos beginning at the 10- to 12-somite stage

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 15 Jul 1993

Cumano A, Furlonger C, Paige CJ

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 8341650

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1993 Jul;90(14):6429-33

The embryonic sites in which progenitors of the hematopoietic lineages first emerge are ideal regions to characterize both the cells and environment needed to initiate blood cell development. For a number of years both the murine yolk sac and embryo have been recognized to contain progenitors of B lymphocytes. However, clonal, quantitative in vitro assays, which allow precise observation of precursors and their progeny, have been lacking. Moreover, the site of origin of the initial events remains controversial. In this report we document the presence of B-cell progenitors in yolk sac and embryonic tissue obtained from mouse fetuses beginning at the 10-somite stage, day 8.5. We determine the frequency, cell-surface phenotype, and growth properties of these progenitors. We show that these cells can differentiate into immunoglobulin-secreting cells and that the progeny derived from single progenitors are diverse with respect to immunoglobulin heavy-chain allotype expression, diversity-joining region use, and heavy-chain variable-region utilization.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8341650