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© Research
Publication : The Journal of general virology

Differential permissivity of human cerebrovascular endothelial cells to enterovirus infection and specificities of serotype EV-A71 in crossing an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of general virology - 23 Feb 2015

Volle R, Archimbaud C, Couraud PO, Romero IA, Weksler B, Mirand A, Pereira B, Henquell C, Peigue-Lafeuille H, Bailly JL

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 25711966

J. Gen. Virol. 2015 Jul;96(7):1682-95

Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3 cell line) form a steady polarized barrier when cultured in vitro on a permeable membrane. Their susceptibility to enterovirus (EV) strains was analysed to investigate how these viruses may cross the blood-brain barrier. A sample of 88 virus strains was selected on phylogenetic features amongst 43 epidemiologically relevant types of the four EV species A-D. The EV-A71 genome was replicated at substantial rates, whilst the infectious virus was released at extremely low but sustained rates at both barrier sides for at least 4 days. EV-A71 antigens were detected in a limited number of cells. The properties of the endothelial barrier (structure and permeability) remained intact throughout infection. The chronic EV-A71 infection was in sharp contrast to the productive infection of cytolytic EVs (e.g. echoviruses E-6 and E-30). The hCMEC/D3 barriers infected with the latter EVs exhibited elevated proportions of apoptotic and necrotic cells, which resulted in major injuries to the endothelial barriers with a dramatic increase of paracellular permeability and virus crossing to the abluminal side. The following intracellular rearrangements were also seen: early destruction of the actin cytoskeleton, remodelling of intracellular membranes and reorganization of the mitochondrion network in a small cluster near the perinuclear space.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25711966